Safety Competencies Challenge

Purpose

Engage the child and youth healthcare community (acute, community and rehabilitation) across Canada in understanding the state of current national practice in relation to the CPSI Safety Competencies Framework.  Using this understanding, commit to a change in culture, practice, policy and ultimately improved health outcomes for the child and youth population.

Objectives:

  • Raise awareness of the Safety Competencies Framework (link to CPSI)
  • Raise awareness of current national practice in patient safety in the child and youth healthcare delivery settings
  • Map current care delivery practices to each Safety Competencies domain. Provide examples of current care delivery practices that fulfill the elements of knowledge, skills and/or attitudes of one or more of the key competencies of the framework.  
  • Using these results develop a national web based resource for safe, quality healthcare delivery practices across the continuum of child and youth healthcare settings,  in a format that can be easily updated to reflect current required standards of practice and changes in knowledge, technology etc.

With support from the Canadian Patient Safety Institute and endorsement from the CAPHC Patient Safety Collaborative a pan-Canadian demonstration project, The Safety Competencies Challenge, was implemented in January 2011

Phase One of the Competencies Challenge concluded with the compilation of an extensive patient safety data base of programs, processes and practices from 7 CAPHC member healthcare organizations serving children and youth across Canada.  The database was organized under the headings of the key competencies of each of the 6 domains.  The purpose of collecting these data was to establish a clear picture of current practice in relation to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) Safety Competencies, identifying areas of strength and gaps in the healthcare system.  The identified strengths to be used as models for other organizations to adapt in their respective settings and the identified gaps, to provide an area of national focus for the CAPHC Patient Safety Collaborative to create new programs and/or initiatives. (See Attached Report) 

Conclusions and Recommendations of Phase 1

It is evident that patient safety is a priority for healthcare organizations serving children and youth. Healthcare centres across Canada continue to provide significant focus and effort in this area.

There is a great willingness to share practices across the child and youth healthcare community.

An opportunity for this level of collaboration will benefit healthcare providers, children and families. Clarification around the purpose and outcomes of patient safety programs and/or policies will add more context and substance to the database.

The language of the Safety Competencies Framework is highly academic and not easily interpreted into daily work language.  

Phase Two  provided a review and synthesis of the database  to remove duplication and provide clarification. Supporting documents specific to the programs were included to add more context and substance to the database. Clarification around the purpose and outcomes of programs or policies was provided. Links were made to the Accreditation Canada RoPs to provide more relevance to the community. The database was organized to be accessed and utilized in an effective manner as a child and youth healthcare Community of Practice.

As a Community of Practice, individuals and organizations are encouraged to use the information provided, offer comments and feedback as well as sharing examples from their own experience.

© 2011 Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres. Site by Hop Creative