Hospital Watch Live: An innovative platform to control & stop superbugs

Synopsis:

 An Accreditation Canada requirement is to reduce the risk of health care-associated infections and their impact across the continuum of care/service; yet healthcare acquired infections continue to be a challenge to systems and organizations across the country. 

How do healthcare acquired infections move around your organization?  If it was easy to track them and identify the most vulnerable areas of transfer then it would likely be less of a burden to the system. 
Toronto General Hospital is piloting a made in Canada technology that tracks the spread of infection throughout an organization.

Niall Wallace, CEO at INFONAUT Evidence Based Infection Control, will describe the project, the technology and how the data collected can be used in a variety of ways. (Read more)

“It’s going to provide a level of understanding that we’ve never had before,” said Dr, Michael Gardam, director of infection prevention and control at the University Health Network. 

Presenter:

Niall Wallace, CEO, Infonaut Inc - Niall Wallace is the co-founder and CEO of Infonaut Inc

Click here for more information and to view the recording.

Hospital Watch Live: An innovative platform to control & stop superbugs

Comparing Participation in Activities Among Children with Disabilities

Synopsis

Children with disabilities are at risk for decreased participations in a wide range of activities as participation may be limited by an underlying medical condition, physiological impairment, or characteristics of the social and physical environment. While specific disability subgroups may be at higher risk for activity limitation and participation restrictions, it is important to examine whether all children with disabilities have decreased participation. The primary purpose of this talk is to provide a participation profile for children with disabilities in Canada and to compare whether children with a neurodevelopmental disorders and disabilities had similar level of participation in a wide range of activities than children with other chronic health conditions.  The 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) children dataset collected by statistics Canada was analyzed.

Presenter

Dr. Louise C Mâsse - Associate Professor Department of Pediatrics / School of Population and Public Health University of British Columbia

Click here for more information and to view the recording.

Comparing Participation in Activities Among Children with Disabilities

Making it Happen: How Clinicians Are Improving Pain Practices on the Frontline

Synopsis:

Advances in pediatric pain research, guidelines, and clinical decision-making models are readily available, but they are not effectively translated into clinical practice and large numbers of hospitalized children continue to experience moderate or severe pain on a regular basis.

The CIHR Team in Children’s Pain brought together 32 hospital units at 8 pediatric hospitals across Canada to narrow the gap between research and practice, by implementing a tailored KT intervention, called Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ). The goal of the intervention was to improve pain practices and decrease pain in hospitalized children. In the 16 units in which EPIQ was implemented, different KT strategies were applied to improve pain assessment and management practices. In these units, pain practices significantly improved in comparison to the 16 units that continued with standard care.

Join us to learn about bringing pain knowledge to the bedside and explore such questions as: 

  1. How do you choose the right KT strategies for your clinical setting? 
  2. How can KT strategies be tailored to your unit’s needs?
  3. What are the benefits and the challenges of using KT strategies to change pain practices?
  4. How do you evaluate the impact of KT on pain practices and outcomes? 

This is the 5th webinar in the CIHR Team in Children’s Pain (PI: Dr. Bonnie Stevens) and CAPHC’s successful Pediatric Pain Series. In this webinar, KT and pain experts and Nurses share their perspectives and experiences of the use of multidimensional knowledge translation (KT) strategies to improve pediatric pain practices and provide examples of strategies used during the EPIQ intervention. Join Dr. Kimberley Widger, Dr. Melanie Barwick, Kathy O’Leary and others, as we explore the practical aspects of applying KT strategies in pediatric care settings, using the casebook method to share lessons learned on what worked, what didn’t, and the overall impact of knowledge translation on acute pain in hospitalized children. 

Presenters:

  • Kimberley Widger, RN, PhD, CHPCN(C)  (SickKids)
  • Kathy O'Leary, BA, BScN, MN (Stollery Children's Hospital)
  • Melanie Barwick, PhD, CPsych (SickKids)
  • Deepshikha G. Wilson, BSc, MN, RN (BC Children's Hospital)

Click here for more information and to view the recording.

Making it Happen: How Clinicians Are Improving Pain Practices on the Frontline

Are families seeing something we're not?

Synopsis:

What would the effect of a patient safety reporting system used by families of paediatric inpatients be on adverse event reporting by healthcare workers?

We are excited to welcome Dr. Jeremy Daniels, resident in Anatomical Pathology at McMaster University, Dr. Mark Ansermino, Associate Professor in the University of British Columbia’s Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics and a Pediatric Anesthesiologist at the British Columbia’s Children’s Hospital and Anne Marie Taylor, Provincial Director of the BC Patient Safety & Learning System.

These presenters will review the background literature, rationale and recent research supporting the need for family and patient adverse event reporting in pediatric health facilities. They will describe their team's approach to designing and testing a computerized system for families of pediatric tertiary-care inpatients to report adverse events that occurred during the child's hospital stay. Family reporting at the study institution will be compared and contrasted with healthcare provider reporting over the same time period. An update on current efforts at BC Children’s Hospital to build on the successful project will also be provided.

Presenters:

  • Jeremy Daniels MD BASc  (McMaster University)
  • Mark Ansermino MBBCH, MMed, MSc (Informatics), FFA (SA), FRCPC (BC Children's)
  • Annemarie Taylor  MA RN (BC Patient Safety & Learning System)

Click here for more information and to view the recording.

Are families seeing something we're not?

Dealing with the current drug shortage: Impact, Strategies & Solutions

Synopsis: 

Planning, budgets, lean processes, just in time ordering….How do we prepare for situations out of our control, situations that leave patients and service providers vulnerable. The current drug shortage is affecting organizations across the country. What is the impact on patient safety when drug substitutions are changing daily and there is uncertainty?  

Presenters:

  • Mr. Richard Jones Vice President, Clinical Services, Patient Safety and Business Development at Medbuy;
  • Mr. Regis Vaillancourt, Director of Pharmacy at Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario; and
  • Mr. Marcel Romanick, Clinical Practice Leader - North Pharmacy Services, Alberta Health Services, Stollery Children’s Hospital

This presentation will look at the impact on service, strategies that have been used to reduce the impact and possible solutions to avoid future risks to patient safety.  

We want you to bring your questions and answers to this call.  This is a time to share how your organization has been able to manage this situation and learn from the experiences of others. 

Dealing with the current drug shortage: Impact, Strategies & Solutions

How to be SMART when Implementing SMART pump Technology

Synopsis:

As part of Phase 3 of the Paediatric Opioid Safety Initiative, CAPHC and ISMP Canada presented this webinar on March 30, 2012.

This one hour webinar will address how newer types of infusion pumps or SMART IV pumps with dose-error reduction systems detect and prevent programming errors to improve patient safety.   Introduction of new technology requires an understanding of the entire system, work flow processes, and the impact changes will have on all system elements.  SMART pump technology (syringe pumps and large volume pumps) were successfully implemented throughout the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO).  Some of the key strategies used to navigate the complexities of the change will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this session participants will: 

• understand the benefits and safety features of SMART pump technology 

• learn about preparation such as current use of pump technology, standardize IV concentrations, creation of drug libraries, and required supports 

• keys to successful implementation including initial and ongoing staff education,  monitoring data and making changes to maximize use of safety features

Audience: VP Patient Care Areas, Patient Safety, Quality Leaders, Risk Management Leads, Directors of Pharmacy, Managers of Patient Care Units, Nurse Educators, Nurses, Pharmacists, Biomedical Engineering and Information Technology

Presenters:

Meechen Tchen - Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario

Shelley McKinney - Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada

Click here for more information and to view the recording.

How to be SMART when Implementing SMART pump Technology

Parenting Matters! Part 2 - Fathering in the Context of Childhood Disability and Health Conditions

Synopsis:

Part 2 in our series from the CIHR Team in Parenting Matters, this presentation reflects several studies examining the experiences of fathers caring for their child with a chronic health condition or disability.  We further will address the couple (or multiple parent) relationship as as it impacts, and is impacted by, this form of caregiving.  Aggregate findings from several studies will be drawn upon, including reflection on our current Parenting Matters! project.  In one component of this multi-study national project, we are examining the experiences of parents of a child with a neuro-development disability.


Overall, findings identify fathers as profoundly affected by their child's chronic health condition and/or disability.  On balance, fathers report admiration for their child and family, as well as a deep sense of responsibility for the well-being of their partner and family.  In part, this pursuit of family well-being appears to be demonstrated by maintaining a 'stiff upper lip' despite substantial (and concealed) personal concern and pain. In varying degrees, fathers describe isolation which may be exacerbated by limited targeted fatherhood support within clinical services, generally unsupportive labour and workplace policies, and discursive presumptions about fatherhood in the context of paediatric chronic conditions.

Couples mutually demonstrate varying processes relative to the navigation of care for their child with a chronic health condition.  Emergent patterns appear to include symmetrical parenting in which parenting tasks are interchangeably fulfilled by both parents, as opposed to complementary parenting whereby caregiving roles and tasks are clearly demarcated.  This presentation will examine these findings and emergent constructs as they are associated with parenting and paediatric chronic health conditions.  Clinical implications will be addressed.

Presenters

For more information on this session go to the CAPHC Knowledge Exchange Network, www.ken.caphc.org.

Parenting Matters! Part 2 - Fathering in the Context of Childhood Disability and Health Conditions

Getting Engaged in Patient Safety through Social Media

Synopsis:

Facebook, Twitter, You Tube; we are surrounded by instant information sources; the opportunities to share seem endless. How can we use all these tools, or others, to promote patient safety?  

Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) has done a great deal  of interesting work with social media. Mr. Saraga will share some of CPSI’s success,  their strategies and what social media means to them.

Presenter:

Abisaac Saraga is CPSI’s web and social media manager, responsible for the institute’s websites and social media efforts.  In his social media role, Abisaac helped jump-start the @Patient_Safety and @SafeCareLibrary Twitter accounts for CPSI, along with its Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube pages.

He has previous marketing experience with companies such as BizBash.TO, MrFranchise.ca, and Micralyne. He joined CPSI in 2009 as web coordinator.

On his own time, Abisaac operates www.glutenfreeedmonton.com, a celiac guide to gluten-free living in Edmonton.

If you have any questions please contact Lisa Stromquist lstromquist@caphc.org

For more information, go to the CAPHC Knowledge Exchange Network at www.ken.caphc.org

Getting Engaged in Patient Safety through Social Media

CAPHC National Screening Tool Kit for FASD: Feedback and Input from Screening Tool Kit Users

Synopsis:

In partnership with many FASD experts, researchers and organizations, the Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres (CAPHC) has facilitated a national initiative, with support from the Public Health Agency of Canada entitled: “Developing a National Screening Tool Kit for Those Identified and Potentially Affected by FASD”.  The “Tool Kit” was officially launched in October 2010.  Drs. Albert Chudley, Sterling Clarren, Gideon Koren, Christine Loock, Stuart MacLeod,and Ted Rosales have been the content experts leading CAPHC’s national steering committee. 

An initial printing of the Tool Kit in English and French was quickly exhausted and many continue to access the Tool Kit on the CAPHC Knowledge Exchange Network (KEN).  In 2011, CAPHC hosted a series of webinars on each of the fivescreening tools to assist practitioners to implement the tools. 

CAPHC would now like to invite users of the Neurobehavioural Screening Tool (NST); the Youth Probation OfficersScreening Tool and the Maternal Drinking Guide to join this webinar and share their experiences in using these tools. Yourfeedback and input is critical to determine the initial impact of the tools on various populations and jurisdictions.  All practitioners interested in the tools and their development are welcome to join.   

Moderator:  

Dr. Albert Chudley, Professor, Dept. of Paediatrics & Child Health, and Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, University of Manitoba, Health Sciences Centre

Click here for more information, or to view the recorded webinar.

CAPHC National Screening Tool Kit for FASD: Feedback and Input from Screening Tool Kit Users

Transport Systems Practitioner Competency Profile - Stakeholder Feeback Session

Synopsis:

At a national symposium entitled “Transport Systems moving our Children across Systems – Challenges, Barriers and Enablers”, held at CAPHC’s 2008 Annual Conference in Edmonton, conference delegates identified the need to develop national standards for the inter-facility transport of critically ill newborns, children and youth.  Many of the people receiving this email will have been at that 2008 session.

As a result of that session CAPHC established a National Transport Systems Steering Committee comprised of multidisciplinary experts from across the country that began to address this issue.

In June 2010, the Transport Systems Steering Committee initiated two working groups to develop specific national standards. The Practitioner Profile Working Group, a team of Canadian neonatal and paediatric medical transport experts, was established to define and recommend a set of minimum standards for Canadian medical transport practitioners.

This webinar from March 6, 2012 from 12:00 to 1:30 ET will share the CAPHC Transport Systems' Competencies Profile - Interfacility Critical Care Transport of Maternal, Neonatal and Paediatric Patients.

This Transport Competencies Profile represents our final draft recommendations for a minimum set of standards for Canadian medical transport teams.  The final draft can viewed on the CAPHC Knowledge Exchange Network at:  http://links.caphc.org/transportcompetenciesdoc

During this hour long session we will hear a presentation describing the objectives of this project and the process that was followed to develop these competencies.  Following the presentation, we will turn to our webinar participants for an interactive feedback session, all of which will be used by the committee to finalize the document.

For more information, go to the CAPHC Knoweldge Exchange Network (www.ken.caphc.org).

Transport Systems Practitioner Competency Profile - Stakeholder Feeback Session

Parenting Matters! Part 1 - Parenting Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities: What Do We Know, and What are the Opportunities?

Synopsis:

Parenting is a dance led by the children.” What people in the developmental disability field often forget is that for reasons beyond their control many children with disabilities don’t dance very easily! We are a group of Canadian health services and social scientists, funded jointly by CIHR and the Bloorview Research Institute, exploring these issues in several ways:

  1. by extensive literature syntheses;
  2. by a review of legal and policy frameworks that affect families of disabled children;
  3. by analyzing population health data to explore parenting issues at a community level; and
  4. through a mixed-methods study with families in four Canadian cities.

In the latter, we expect to engage 60 families in each city to complete a package of questionnaires developed with our National Research Advisory Group, and then to invite 10 mothers and fathers from each city to participate in face-to-face qualitative interviews to explore their experience of being a parent to a child or youth with a neurodevelopmental disorder (e.g., autism, global developmental delay, etc.).

Part 1 - Parenting Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities: What Do We Know, and What are the Opportunities? originally aired on February 28th, 2012 at 11:00 - 12:30 ET.  


The main purpose of this webinar is to share what we have learned to date about parent health and well-being, and about parenting as reported in the NLSCY database. We will report on the progress of the study, and speculate about the potential utility of the findings for prevention and intervention studies to help parents on their parenting journey with children with neurodevelopmental disorders. We will also seek people’s advice about KT opportunities once the studies are done.

Presenters

  • Dr. Lucyna M. Lach, Associate Professor, School of Social Work, McGill University
  • Dr. Peter Rosenbaum, CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, McMaster University
  • Dr. Dafna Kohen, Principal Researcher, Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada
  • Dr. Rubab Arim, Research Scientist, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, and Research Analyst, Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada

Click here for more information and to view the recording.

Parenting Matters! Part 1

Falls Prevention Strategies - Do paediatric facilities really need them?

Synopsis:

Often we think that the Accreditation Canada’s ROP on falls prevention applies more to long term care, but what is the occurrence of children’s falls within health facilities? 

What age group is the most at risk and how is that risk assessed?   
When are falls most likely to happen? 
What strategies are in place at your centre to prevent falls and how are the strategies evaluated? 

Join us on November 25th 11:00 – 12:00 EST as we welcome Nida DeChamp, Occurrence Systems Coordinator, Quality and Patient Safety at the IWK to the CAPHC Patient Safety Collaborative. 

Tracy Wrong, CAPHC Patient Safety Collaborative co-chair, will set the stage and share a bit of CHEO’s experience with this ROP and Nida will describe how her organization developed a falls prevention program. 

Falls may lead to client injury, increased length of stay, and possibly legal action.  Reducing falls can improve the experience of clients and reduce the associated costs. 

Following the presentation we would like to have a round table discussion.  Please join us and share your experience and strategy. 

Presenters:

  • Tracy Wrong
  • Nida DeChamp

Click here for more information and to view the recording.

Falls Prevention Strategies - Do paediatric facilities really need them?

Why can't I get any information about my child's mental health problems?

Synopsis:

Do parents want information about their child’s mental health problems?

Do mental health professionals want to share information about children’s mental health problems? 

If you don’t know where to go or what questions to ask it is difficult to find the right answers. The internet is crowded with information that may or may not be current or factual and a Google search can pull up a multitude of results. Parents then have to sift through and try to determine which are legitimate and relevant to them.

The National Infant, Child and Youth Mental Health Consortium welcomed Dr. Michael Cheng and Mr. Don Buchanan to a webinar on November 16th 2011, 1:00 – 2:30 pm EST. 

"Why can't I get any information about my child's mental health problems?"

Join us as we look at how people access information on child and youth mental health, what they are looking for, what is available and how the system helps or hinders their search for answers.

Learn how mental health professionals can do a better job of making information available to improve mental health literacy and guide parents to accurate trustworthy sources.

There will be opportunity for questions and comments.

Presenters:

  • Dr. Michael Cheng
  • Mr. Don Buchanan

Click here for more information and to view the recording.

Why can't I get any information about my child's mental health problems?

Provision of Health Services Across Provincial Jurisdictions: An Analysis of Costs vs Inter-Provincial Billing Rates

Presenters

  • Denise Arsenault, VP Finance & Chief Financial Officer, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON.
  • Irene Blais, Director Decision Support, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON.
  • Chair:  Allan Horsburgh, Vice President of Operations and Support Services and Chief Financial Officer, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS

Synopsis

The interprovincial hospital billing agreements are intended to provide coverage of medically necessary insured health services for eligible patients of provincial/territorial health insurance plans.  Hospital services provided to out-of-province patients must be billed in accordance with the interprovincial hospital billing agreements.  For tertiary hospitals, many of the interprovincial activity is focused on more complex and higher cost patients requiring care due to proximity and/or lack of specialty services geographically.

Using its case costing system, SickKids has been analyzing both the costs and associated billing rates for patients (both inpatient and outpatient) over the last 2 years and a number of areas of concern have emerged from this analysis.  SickKids will share its analysis and findings with CAPHC peers in order to enhance understanding of current interprovincial billing limitations with others.  This will provide the basis for a discussion to determine whether any next steps are warranted from a CAPHC collective with the Interprovincial Health Insurance Agreements Coordinating Committee (IHIACC).

Click here for more informtion about this webinar and to view the recording.

Provision of Health Services Across Provincial Jurisdictions: An Analysis of Costs vs Inter-Provincial Billing Rates

Inviting Families in to Improve Patient Safety

Presenters:

  • Nick Joachimides, RN, MCISc
  • Hope Chick, RN, MN
  • Heather McCrady, BA, MTS

Synopsis:

As patients, families, and health professionals learn to support one another to improve quality and safety a strong foundation for culture change can be created. Building and expanding on existing programs will help to facilitate the creation of evidence based tools to further patient and family engagement in patient safety. The CAPHC Patient Safety Collaborative would like to showcase initiatives at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehab and Stollery Children’s Hospital where families are invited in and expected to be part of the development and implementation of safety programs. On the September 23rd CAPHC Patient Safety Collaborative call: Nick Joachimides will discuss the advantages of including families in pushing the patient safety agenda forward. His presentation will address concerns raised by committee members regarding the inclusion of families on committees, and how to address the concerns. Hope Chick and Heather McCrady will present on family involvement in the Stollery Family Centred Care Network. This network represents over 150 family members, staff and physicians who have an interest in family centred care at Stollery Children’s Hospital and work collaboratively for common goals.

Click here for more information, or to view the recorded webinar.

Inviting Families in to Improve Patient Safety

The Ethics of Meconium Testing as Part of a Screening Toolkit for FASD

Synopsis:

The following information was part of session held in conjunction with the 12th Annual Fetal Alcohol Canadian Expertise (FACE) Research Roundtable on September 12th, at the Stanhope Beach Resort & Conference Centre, in Prince Edward Island.

Sponsored by:  The Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres FASD Steering Committee and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Symposium Co-Chairs:  
Dr. Stuart MacLeod, Professor, Paediatrics, Child and Family Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia
Dr. Gideon Koren, Professor of Paediatrics, Pharmacology, Pharmacy, Medicine and Medical Genetics, University of Toronto, National Lead – The Motherisk Program at The Hospital for Sick Children and Fetal Alcohol Canadian Expertise – FACE

Meconium Testing is one of the screening methods identified as part of the newly developed National Screening Tool Kit for Children and Youth.  Meconium Testing has the capacity to identify fetal alcohol exposure through meconium sampling and testing post-natally.  This symposium will explore various aspects and implications of meconium testing.  Experts in related fields will present research as well as different perspectives on testing.  Participants will have an opportunity to actively engage in discussion on the epidemiology of FASD, the What and Why of testing, results from recent Canadian studies and the ethical legal considerations related to meconium testing.

Presentations:

Click here for more information and to view the recording.

Ethics of Meconium Testing

Why can't my kids get help? Issues in access to child and youth mental health

Synopsis:

The National Infant Child and Youth Mental Health Consortium invites you to attend Why can't my kid get help:  Issues in access to child and youth mental health?

Join us as we welcome Dr. Pat McGrath and Dr. Amanda Newton to provide context to the growing issues around access to appropriate mental health services for children and youth. Find new ways to look at the same situations and explore the many ideas and novel approaches to overcoming the persistent barriers.   We encourage you to come prepared to share your ideas and experience with The Consortium!

Patrick McGrath is a psychologist, professor, scientist and bureaucrat at the IWK Health Centre and Dalhousie University. With funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Foundation for Innovation, Canada Research Chairs, and the Hospital for Sick Kids, his team developed Strongest Families, a distance intervention for child mental health problems. Trials have been conducted and Strongest Families now serves families in Nova Scotia, Ontario and Alberta. 

Mandi Newton is a clinician scientist and assistant professor at the Stollery Children’s Hospital and University of Alberta. She is interested in improving the mental health care children and youth receive in the Emergency Department - an important mental health care systems entry point in times of acute crisis and illness deterioration. To date, evidence-informed clinical practices for this setting are lacking and access to mental health services after a crisis visit to the Emergency Department is a challenge for Canadian families. Dr. Newton’s research bridges researchers, health care providers, decision-makers, and administrators at local, provincial, and national levels to improve service delivery and family experiences.

Presenters:

Pat McGrath, OC, PhD, FRSC, FCAHS - Vice President Research, IWK Health Centre, Professor of Psychology, Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Canada Research Chair, Dalhousie University

Amanda S. Newton, PhD, RN - 
Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta
Clinician Scientist, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Women and Children's Health Research Institute, Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, AB

Click here for more information and to view the recording.

Why Can't My Kid Get Help

Why can't my kids get help? Issues in access to child and youth mental health

Synopsis:

The National Infant Child and Youth Mental Health Consortium invites you to attend

Why can't my kid get help:  Issues in access to child and youth mental health?

A webinar presentation September 9, 2011, 1:00 – 2:30 pm EDT 

Join us as we welcome Dr. Pat McGrath and Dr. Amanda Newton to provide context to the growing issues around access to appropriate mental health services for children and youth. Find new ways to look at the same situations and explore the many ideas and novel approaches to overcoming the persistent barriers.   We encourage you to come prepared to share your ideas and experience with The Consortium!

Patrick McGrath is a psychologist, professor, scientist and bureaucrat at the IWK Health Centre and Dalhousie University. With funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Foundation for Innovation, Canada Research Chairs, and the Hospital for Sick Kids, his team developed Strongest Families, a distance intervention for child mental health problems. Trials have been conducted and Strongest Families now serves families in Nova Scotia, Ontario and Alberta. 

Mandi Newton is a clinician scientist and assistant professor at the Stollery Children’s Hospital and University of Alberta. She is interested in improving the mental health care children and youth receive in the Emergency Department - an important mental health care systems entry point in times of acute crisis and illness deterioration. To date, evidence-informed clinical practices for this setting are lacking and access to mental health services after a crisis visit to the Emergency Department is a challenge for Canadian families. Dr. Newton’s research bridges researchers, health care providers, decision-makers, and administrators at local, provincial, and national levels to improve service delivery and family experiences.

Presenters:

  • Pat McGrath, OC, PhD, FRSC, FCAHS
  • Amanda S. Newton, PhD, RN

Click here for more information and to view the webinar recording.

Why can't my kids get help?

Medicine Wheel Tools for FASD Screening

Synopsis:

These tools were developed to provide a culturally sensitive assessment or screening tool with a broad enough lens to take in the broad range of needs and strengths that exist in an aboriginal school and community system. At the present time there is no culturally sensitive school screening tool to determine which children should be referred for assessment of conditions that seriously impair behavior and learning such as trauma or pre-natal exposures to alcohol and/or drugs. There are also few pedagogical models or interventions appropriate to a modern aboriginal school and community system. These tools were developed to help educators and other service professionals determine individual and collective ‘needs and strengths’ in an indigenous school and community system.

The Medicine Wheel Tools Consist Of:

The Medicine Wheel Tools have not been normed to large population samples. They are useful for screening, referral, needs assessment and goal setting in a community setting. They should not be used, however, as the sole criteria for determination of specific disabilities. Individuals with high level of needs should be referred to appropriate service professionals and if possible connected to community elders.  

In the Medicine Wheel approach screening leads to referral for assessment and diagnosis if necessary. The purpose of the screening process is an intervention that will help the individual grow and heal and reconnect to their own possibilities.

Presenter:

  • Lori Vitale Cox

Click here for more information and to view the webinar recording.

Medicine Wheel Screening Tools for FASD