CAPHC Encouraged by Child & Youth Friendly Budget Announcements


 
 

The Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres (CAPHC), the national association that represents healthcare delivery organizations providing health services for children, youth and their families, is encouraged by the investments announced in Budget 2017 to strengthen our health care system, in particular those targeting First Nations, Inuit and Metis children and youth.

Budget 2017 builds on priorities established through recently negotiated health transfers between the federal government and provinces and territories (investments in mental health and home care), and addresses gaps which directly impact the health and wellbeing of children and youth across the country.

Specifically, CAPHC is pleased to see $828.2 million over five years to improve the health outcomes of First Nations children and youth – including mental health services and harm reduction measures for this vulnerable population. Further, $83.2 million of this amount is targeted to expand maternal and child health services for First Nations and Inuit families with children under the age of six.

CAPHC applauds the federal government for its continuing support of the Canadian Institute for Health Information ($53 million) to address health data gaps to support improved health decision making. CAPHC and CIHI are close partners, who together facilitate an integrated approach for data sharing to enable access to pediatric decision support tools through CAPHC’s Canadian Paediatric Decision Support Network (CPDSN).

Strategic investments in Canada Health Infoway ($300 million), the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement ($51 million), the opioid crisis ($100 million) and changes to parental leave and Employment Insurance benefits will all positively impact the health and wellbeing of our children and youth.

“CAPHC is pleased to see the federal government respond to challenges facing Canada’s paediatric population, in particular the mental and physical health of First Nations children and youth. We look forward to working with our federal partners to recognize the value of, and honour the commitment to establish a Commissioner for Children and Youth” – Dr. Peter Fitzgerald, Chair, CAPHC.

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About CAPHC: 
The Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres (CAPHC) is a non-profit organization recognized as a leader in advancing the improvement of healthcare for Canada’s children and youth. CAPHC’s mandate is to affect system-wide change in the delivery of healthcare services by focusing on innovative initiatives and programs that have broad national relevance. Today, CAPHC is proud to support inter-professional child and youth health care providers and families from more than 70 organizations in Canada. 

To learn more about CAPHC’s programs, partners, and services, visit www.caphc.org or follow us on Twitter, @CAPHCTweets.

 

Contact:
Emily Gruenwoldt
President & CEO, CAPHC
egruenwoldt@caphc.org 
613-371-5813

‘Passport’ helps parents plan move from hospital to home

Over the next few months, CAPHC Conversations will feature stories from BLOOM, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital’s online resource for parenting children with disabilities. For more information, please contact BLOOM editor Louise Kinross at 416 424 3866.
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A parent who spent 16 months at her daughter’s bedside at Holland Bloorview has given a gift to other parents of inpatients.

The Transition Passport is a binder that helps parents organize their child’s health information and plan for the extensive equipment and supports they may need to move back home.

The idea came from Sadia Qureshi, whose daughter Zoya had been a healthy six-year-old until she woke one morning seizing. After two months in acute-care, where she continued to seize and was intubated, she came to Holland Bloorview.

“We had no idea where we would go from here, that there would be life after Holland Bloorview,” Sadia says.

The passport organizes what parents need into sections: checklists of equipment and medication; funding sources and school planning; a place to record important dates, keep therapy schedules and take team meeting notes; and a holder for business cards for key staff who work with your child.

“As a parent who had never been through this, I didn’t know what equipment we would need at home, or even that funding was available,” Sadia says. “I didn’t know that schooling for Zoya would be a choice. I didn’t know it was possible to live in your home with support. The passport has checklists you can go through with your physiotherapist or nurse or social worker to help you plan according to your child’s needs.”

The process of moving home with Zoya was “very difficult, long and not easy,” Sadia says. She often didn’t realize that she needed certain things until she took Zoya home for short trial stays. “It’s hard to know what to expect. The passport will help parents pre-plan, so it won’t be as stressful or take as long.”

Sadia worked with a discharge steering committee at Holland Bloorview to bring the binder to life.

“Being part of this group was a wonderful experience,” she says. “I shared everything—what was great about our transition experience, what we need to work on, and what I think will be most appropriate for parents.”

Anna Marie Batelaan, social worker on the brain injury rehab team, says families “are finding it extremely useful as a way to keep organized and keep all of their documents from acute care and here in one place. For a lot of them the health care system is new and foreign. Many families come in with a shopping bag full of reports and they have trouble laying their fingers on what they want to show you. This binder gives them a framework for keeping it all in one place. They keep reports, home programs and medication lists in there. It’s one location where you can put everything. I have families who have moved home who continue to use it as outpatients, so they don’t have to keep track of everything in their own head.”

The Transition Passport team received the Sheila Jarvis Impact on Client and Family Centred Care Award for 2016. You can download your own copy or ask your social worker for one.

“Our goal is that this will assist families in partnership with their clinical team—not just with organizing information, but with helping them prepare for meetings and ask the questions that are important to them,” says Elaine Widgett, interim senior director of inpatient rehabilitation.

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The CAPHC team is always interested in learning more about what is happening in the paediatric health care community. If you have a program, event, website, or initiative that you would like to share with the country, email info@caphc.org for more information.

Pocket Doc for Pneumonia: Top 10 Google.org Impact Challenge finalist

This is a guest post submitted by Dr. Niranjan "Tex" Kissoon, Vice President Medical Affairs
BC Children’s Hospital and Sunny Hill Health Centre for Children.


A new smartphone tool called the PocketDoc for Pneumonia will help health care workers in remote areas and developing countries accurately diagnose pneumonia, quickly provide treatment and save lives. 

Pneumonia is the single largest cause of death among children under five. Although it can be treated with antibiotics, many children with pneumonia don’t receive the treatment they need.

The low-cost Pocket Doc for Pneumonia has been selected as one of the top 10 finalists out of more than 900 applications for the Google.org Impact Challenge Canada. The public online voting competition is open now until Tuesday, March 28. The top five projects will receive $750,000 each and the runners up will each receive $250,000.

This project is being led by Dr. Mark AnserminoDr. Tex Kissoon and Dr. Guy Dumont

For more information about the project, visit bcchr.ca/impact-challenge

We need your votes to save children's lives!

Vote until Tuesday, March 28, 2017. 

New CPS position statement: Counselling and management for anticipated extremely preterm birth

This is a guest post submitted by the Canadian Paediatric Society.

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For your interest, please find attached a new position statement from the Canadian Paediatric Society’s Fetus and Newborn Committee entitled: Counselling and management for anticipated extremely preterm birth.

En français : Les conseils et la prise en charge en prévision d’une naissance extrêmement prématurée

Abstract

"Counselling couples facing the birth of an extremely preterm infant is a complex and delicate task, entailing both challenges and opportunities. This revised position statement proposes using a prognosis-based approach that takes the best estimate of gestational age into account, along with additional factors, including estimated fetal weight, receipt of antenatal corticosteroids, singleton versus multiple pregnancy, fetal status and anomalies on ultrasound, and place of birth. This statement updates data on survival in Canada, long-term neurodevelopmental disability at school age and quality of life, with focus on strategies to communicate effectively with parents. It also proposes a framework for determining the prognosis-based management option(s) to present to parents when initiating the decision-making process. This statement replaces the 2012 position statement."

Résumé

" Il est complexe et délicat de donner des conseils aux couples qui font face à la naissance d’un extrême prématuré. C’est un processus qui comporte à la fois des difficultés et des perspectives. Le présent document de principes révisé fait appel à une démarche fondée sur le pronostic, qui tient compte de la meilleure évaluation de l’âge gestationnel et d’autres facteurs, tels que le poids estimatif du fœtus, l’administration d’une corticothérapie prénatale, une grossesse monofœtale ou multiple, l’état et les anomalies du fœtus à l’échographie et le lieu de l’accouchement. Le présent document de principes, qui met à jour des données sur la survie au Canada, sur les incapacités neurodéveloppementales à long terme qui se manifestent à l’âge scolaire et sur la qualité de vie, est axé sur les stratégies visant une communication efficace avec les parents. Il contient également un cadre pour déterminer les options de prise en charge en fonction du pronostic à proposer aux parents au début du processus décisionnel. Il remplace celui de 2012. "

Teens Taking Charge: Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)

Over the next few months, CAPHC Conversations will be featuring articles and resources from the AboutKidsHealth website.  For more information on AboutKidsHealth, check out their website, or contact Sean Schurr at sean.schurr@sickkids.ca.
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Teens ‘take charge’ with new online program for kids and teens with arthritis - Valuable resource now publicly available on AboutKidsHealth.ca

It is a common assumption that arthritis is a disease that affects adults only, however an estimated 24,000 Canadian children and teens live with one or more forms of childhood arthritis, of which juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common, affecting about 10,000 (one in 1,000) children in Canada.

JIA causes inflammation in the joints and impacts kids’ and teens’ physical, emotional and social wellbeing.

In an effort to help teens with JIA better manage their arthritis and improve their transition to adult health care, a team of researchers led by Dr. Jennifer Stinson at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) developed an online program called ‘Teens Taking Charge: Managing JIA Online Program’, which is now publicly available on aboutkidshealth.ca.

“As teens mature and gain independence in many areas of their lives, they are similarly expected to take on more responsibility for managing their arthritis,” says Dr. Stinson, principal investigator of this research and Nurse Clinician-Scientist in the Chronic Pain Program at SickKids. “Previous research indicates that for teens with a chronic condition, learning to manage their complex medical condition on their own is very challenging and if not done effectively can negatively impact their health.”

This interactive internet-based program was designed for teens with JIA as well as for their parents as a reliable, easily accessible resource to be used throughout the course of their illness. The content, delivered in 12 modules, was developed by rheumatology health care professionals across Canada. It includes not only information about JIA, its treatments, and self-management strategies (for example, how to deal with physical symptoms like pain, stiffness, fatigue and emotional symptoms like anxiety and depression), but also facilitates peer support through discussion boards, as well as videos featuring patients, their families, and health-care providers offering instruction, personal insight and inspiration.  

Feedback from teens and their families was that there was not one reliable place where they could get the information they needed and their questions answered.

“As a teen, I found myself asking a lot of questions about how JIA would affect my future, how it’ll be when I’m in university, what does this mean when I have a job and how long these medications will be affecting my life? Going through the modules in the Teens Taking Charge program helped me better understand arthritis, which gave me the self-confidence to manage what I was going through,” says Madeleine Dempster, 19, former SickKids patient and research participant on this project. “The doctors and nurses have always been great at explaining things to me during my appointments, but this website provides more of a base knowledge and a deeper understanding since I can go through it at my own pace. This is very reassuring and makes me feel more in control of my life.”

The website was tested for effectiveness using a randomized controlled trial of 333  adolescents from 11 paediatric centres across Canada.

“The results so far have shown that teens who used this online resource tended to experienced less overall pain, and less pain interference with sleep and enjoyment of daily life as well as self-efficacy, compared to teens who did not use the site,” says Stinson.

The majority of teens with JIA, as well most chronic health conditions, do not receive comprehensive education, disease management strategies or social support, because of difficulty accessing services, limited availability of trained professionals, and the costs associated with running in-person education programs. Stinson and her team hopes Teens Taking Charge program will help patients develop the skills they need to better care for themselves as they grow up, understand how different lifestyle choices will impact their condition and importantly, learn to advocate for themselves.

This bilingual interactive internet-based program was funded by The Arthritis Society and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

“This project is one of a number of investments in childhood arthritis research that The Arthritis Society’s donors have made possible in recent years, and we’re so pleased to see it come to fruition,” says Arthritis Society president and CEO Janet Yale. “We’re proud to partner with Dr. Stinson and her fellow investigators on this collaborative effort that will benefit thousands of young people across Canada, empowering them to live well today while we work together towards a cure.”

To learn more, check out the full site available on aboutkidshealth.ca.
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The CAPHC team is always interested in learning more about what is happening in the paediatric health care community. If you have a program, event, website, or initiative that you would like to share with the country, email info@caphc.org for more information.

It takes a nation

This is a guest post submitted by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute

It’s amazing what can be accomplished when we work together. Case in point, the actions of the National Patient Safety Consortium – a nationwide effort to improve the quality and safety of healthcare.

“The power of partnership is invaluable in this line of work,” says Chris Power, CEO, Canadian Patient Safety Institute. “Whether it is the Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres, or any of the other 50-plus partners spread across the country, this is a real show of strength for the patient safety movement in Canada.”

While a wide variety of actions, tools and resources have been produced as part of the Consortium work to date, here are some that are the most applicable to anyone working in a paediatric healthcare setting:

The beauty of these efforts is that it didn’t fall on any one group to lead the charge as several organizations stepped forward to take a leadership role, or in some cases a supporting role, in the various action items.

If you’re an active participation in the National Patient Safety Consortium, thank you for your contributions to this work. If this is all new to you, you can learn more here or by visiting any of the links above.

Wisdom2Action: From Trauma to Resilience

This is a guest post submitted by the Children and Youth in Challenging Contexts (CYCC) Network.

Wisdom2Action: From Trauma to Resilience (W2A-TR) is a knowledge mobilization and outreach event that addresses sexual violence experienced by Canadian youth. Hosted by the CYCC Network in collaboration with local and national partners, this event will bring together a diverse group of people who are involved in preventing sexual violence and in supporting young people who experience it. W2A-TR will allow people passionate about improving the mental health and well-being of young people to build their networks and be exposed to best and promising practices.

The event is open to researchers, community service providers, educators, government agencies, youth, and others who work with young people to prevent or respond to sexual violence.

Developing hearing tests for newborns

The CHEO Research Institute’s Spotlight on Research video series showcases some of their leading researchers in priority areas.  Over the coming months we will be sharing some of these videos through the CAPHC Conversations Blog.

For more information on the CHEO Research Institute or the Spotlight on Research series, contact Adrienne Vienneau, Director, Communications and Public Relations at avienneau@cheo.on.ca.
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Dr. Dennis Bulman, senior scientist at CHEO, discusses his research in newborn screening. Bulman’s team is currently focused on identifying babies that are at risk of permanently losing their hearing.

Learn more about Dr. Bulman: http://www.cheori.org/en/researchers?... 

A written transcript of this video is available in French, upon request. Please email RIwebmaster@cheo.on.ca

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The CAPHC team is always interested in learning more about what is happening in the paediatric health care community. If you have a program, event, website, or initiative that you would like to share with the country, email info@caphc.org for more information.

The Kids Are Not Alright: The Urgent Need for a National Dialogue to Invest in the Wellbeing of Canada’s Children

This is a guest post submitted by Sara L. Austin, Founder and President/CEO of Children's First Canada.

Canada is the 5th most prosperous nation in the world, but Canadian kids aren’t reaping the benefits. We rank 17th globally for the wellbeing of children, and drop to 27th place for child health and safety. We can and must do better: Canada’s future depends on it.

After Children First's initial 2016 launch on the EC platform in Toronto, we are proud to bring this important discussion to Ottawa. 

Moderator: André PicardPublic Health Reporter, The Globe and Mail

Panelists:  

  • Sara L. Austin, Founder, President & CEO, Children First
  • Ashley Whiteman, Prime Minister's Youth Council Member, Government of Canada
  • The Honourable Landon Pearson O.C., Landon Pearson Centre for the Study of Childhood and Children’s Rights, Carleton University
  • Alex Munter, President and Chief Executive Officer, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO)
  • Ted Woodhead, Senior Vice President, Federal Government and Regulatory Affairs
    TELUS Communications Company

Click here for more information and to register for this event

Member price: 
Individual seat: $89 +HST
Table (seats 10): $800 +HST

Regular price: 
Individual seat: $110 +HST
Table (seats 10): $990 +HST

- Lunch will be served -

Important: 
- For information about accessibility, please email peters@economicclub.ca
- Dietary restriction notes and meal requests must be submitted to peters@economicclub.ca 48 hours in advance of event.

Announcement: New CAPHC President & CEO, PCC Executive Director - Emily Gruenwoldt

Joint Announcement from Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres (CAPHC) and the Paediatric Chairs of Canada (PCC)

It is with great pleasure that we introduce Emily Gruenwoldt as the new President & CEO, Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres, and Executive Director, Paediatric Chairs of Canada, effective January 30, 2017.  Emily joins CAPHC & PCC following the retirement of Elaine Orrbine, who provided over 15 years of exemplary services to the organizations and to children and families across Canada.  We’ve had many opportunities to wish Elaine the very best in her well-earned retirement.

Emily comes to CAPHC and PCC with a wealth of leadership experience in health care and association management.  Most recently, Emily has served as Director, Professional Affairs and Director, Physician Learning and Development, at the Canadian Medical Association, where she has led strategic initiatives to advance the medical profession and to increase and support leadership capability and capacity – among other strategic and operational responsibilities.  Emily has also worked previously with the Association of Canadian Academic Healthcare Organizations.  Emily also brings significant health care governance experience having served as a board member of The Ottawa Hospital and as a current member of the Arnprior Regional Health board.  The joint CAPHC/PCC Selection Committee was particularly impressed with Emily’s intelligence, strategic vision, and communications skills, as well as her clear passion for the health of Canada’s children and youth.  

Please share this message throughout your organizations and networks, and join us in welcoming Emily to the CAPHC/PCC family.  

On behalf of,

Peter Fitzgerald,
Chair, CAPHC Board of Directors

Allison Eddy,
President, PCC

 

   

Using best evidence to inform surgeries at CHEO

The CHEO Research Institute’s Spotlight on Research video series showcases some of their leading researchers in priority areas.  Over the coming months we will be sharing some of these videos through the CAPHC Conversations Blog.

For more information on the CHEO Research Institute or the Spotlight on Research series, contact Adrienne Vienneau, Director, Communications and Public Relations at avienneau@cheo.on.ca.
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Dr. Ahmad Nasr and his CHEO research team use evidence-based research to help uncover why childhood illness happens and how they are best treated. The ultimate goal of his research is always directed towards better outcomes for children and helping doctors to treat young patients in the fastest, most stress-free way possible. 

Learn more about Dr. Nasr: http://www.cheori.org/en/researchers?...

A written transcript of this video is available in French, upon request. Please email RIwebmaster@cheo.on.ca

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The CAPHC team is always interested in learning more about what is happening in the paediatric health care community. If you have a program, event, website, or initiative that you would like to share with the country, email info@caphc.org for more information.

Teens Taking Charge Transplant Website Launched December 1

Over the next few months, CAPHC Conversations will be featuring articles and resources from the AboutKidsHealth website.  For more information on AboutKidsHealth, check out their website, or contact Sean Schurr at sean.schurr@sickkids.ca.

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A new self-management website for transplant patients ages 12 - 18 has been developed by the Transplant and Regenerative Medicine Centre (TRMC) at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids). The impetus for Teens Taking Charge emerged from a needs assessment with teen patients and parents at SickKids. Discussions with these teens illustrated that there is a need for a range of tailored resources about their medical condition. Teen patients articulated factors such as pain, issues with body image, and wanting to be normal as common health-related stressors in their lives. These patients also described the need for resources about their health condition that can be accessed gradually overtime to compliment one-on-one time with health-care team members.

The website responds to these needs by helping teens learn how their peers have successfully coped with difficult issues and how they can manage their own long-term health. By providing a range of resources and advice, it offers hope to teens that they too can live successfully with a transplant. As teenage kidney and liver transplant patients navigate the transplant journey with their families, the website provides accessible education and support. This user friendly website, validated through usability testing, aims to engage families in the health education process. The website will also provide a tool for use by healthcare providers when communicating with transplanted teenaged-patients and their families.

The website features a number of interactive modules, including:

  • video clips of peers talking about medications, lifestyle changes and their transition to adult care
  • step-by- step animations showing what happens before, during and after transplant surgery
  • a range of tips and guidelines about how best to prepare for and manage their transplant
  • downloadable tools such as a health journal, medication schedules, diet sheets and more.

The content for Teens Taking Charge was developed by an interdisciplinary team of health-care professionals comprised of nurses, physicians, dieticians, social workers and surgeons, working with medical illustrators and medical content developers. Developed through a partnership between the TRMC and AboutKidsHealth, funding for the project was provided by Astellas Foundation and the Kidney Foundation of Canada and the needs assessment was funded by the Evelyn Simpson Reeves fund.  

 Teen patients reviewed and tested the website during its different stages of development. Feedback was generated about what aspects of the website needed revisions, or could be improved and if any content was missing. This input was used to improve key features of the website, including navigation, content, and design. Additionally, the teenaged patients were clear about what aspects make the website attractive for teens to use.

At the end of the usability testing on the website, teenaged patients gave verbal feedback, including:

“[The website is] pretty easy to navigate, if you’re looking for something specific then you can find it pretty easily”

“[I] like the video because kids who don’t know very much can see other people’s point of view. And it’s helpful; it makes you learn a little”

A section for parents on the Teens Taking Charge website aims to help strategize what skills their child needs to be more independent and how to help them develop those skills. It also includes suggestions for successfully transitioning health-care responsibilities from parent to child before and after the transplant period.

Please bookmark teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/transplant and share the link with your colleagues. If you have any feedback or would like further information, please contact transplantandregenerativemedicine.centre@sickkids.ca.

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The CAPHC team is always interested in learning more about what is happening in the paediatric health care community. If you have a program, event, website, or initiative that you would like to share with the country, email info@caphc.org for more information.

Harnessing stem cells to treat premature lung disease

The CHEO Research Institute’s Spotlight on Research video series showcases some of their leading researchers in these priority areas.  Over the coming months we will be sharing some of these videos through the CAPHC Conversations Blog.

For more information on the CHEO Research Institute or the Spotlight on Research series, contact Adrienne Vienneau, Director, Communications and Public Relations at avienneau@cheo.on.ca.

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Dr. Bernard Thébaud, a senior scientist and physician in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at CHEO, discusses the amazing healing power of stem cells from umbilical cords to treat lung disease in premature babies. His team has demonstrated that human umbilical cord stem cells can prevent lung injury and restore damaged lung tissue. Dr. Thébaud is working on translating these discoveries all the way to the clinic. 

Learn more about Dr. Thébaud: http://www.cheori.org/en/researchers?...

A written transcript of this video is available in French, upon request. Please email RIwebmaster@cheo.on.ca

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The CAPHC team is always interested in learning more about what is happening in the paediatric health care community. If you have a program, event, website, or initiative that you would like to share with the country, email info@caphc.org for more information.

New Canadian Paediatric Nursing Standards!

This is a guest post submitted by Bonnie Fleming-Carroll, the Associate Chief of Nursing & Inter-Professional Education at The Hospital for Sick Children. 

We had the great pleasure of unveiling the first Canadian Paediatric Nursing Standards at the CAPHC meeting in October this year during the Nursing Leadership Breakfast Session. Recognizing the unique dimensions and growing complexity of health care needs of children in Canada and their families, a group of nursing leaders and clinicians from across Canada came togetherto develop Canadian-specific paediatric nursing standards which proceed to a two round e-Delphi consensus process.  The standards are aimed to serve as a framework for paediatric nursing delivery across all sectors and to provide consistency in describing expertise and scope of practice of a paediatric nurse. Our next steps for implementation include re-establishing the Canadian Association of Paediatric Nurses (CAPN) in partnership with the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA).  Through the dissemination and implementation of the standards and the revitalized CAPN we are excited about the positive impact nurses will have on the future health and well-being of children in Canada. You will currently find the standards document on the Knowledge Exchange Network (KEN) on the CAPHC website. For further inquiries please email paeds.nurse@sickkids.ca

CAPN website coming soon early 2017!!!

Click here to view the Standards document on the CAPHC Knowledge Exchange Network.

#ItDoesntHaveToHurt partners with Twitter Canada to engage with parents about children’s pain

This is a guest post submitted by Christine Chambers, PhD, Canada Research Chair in Children’s Pain, Dalhousie University & IWK Health Centre @drcchambers

For the last year, we have been partnering with Erica Ehm’s YummyMummyClub.ca (YMC) to bring parents #ItDoesntHaveToHurt, a social media initiative aimed to improve parents awareness and used of evidence-based information about children’s pain.  ItDoesntHaveToHurt translates scientific knowledge children’s pain management into blog posts, YouTube videos, Twitter parties, Facebook polls, and Instagram images, all posted and promoted on the YMC website and social media. Since its launch in September 2015, #ItDoesntHaveToHurt as generated over 130 million impressions (i.e., possible content views) and won multiple awards including, most recently, Best Online Campaign at the Canadian Online Publishers Awards, and was a Finalist for Best Branded Content at the DIGI awards, which recognize the best in Canadian digital media.

#ItDoesntHaveToHurt marked its first anniversary with a special knowledge translation event at Twitter Canada Headquarters in Toronto on September 15, 2016. The event brought together all the scientists, parents, members of the health community (including two representatives from the Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres), content creators, and digital influencers who have partnered to develop, implement, and evaluate #ItDoesntHaveToHurt.

The live event was complemented by a 1 hour online Twitter party that allowed parents and scientists to engage live about various topics in children’s pain. In addition to allowing us to base our event at their headquarters, Twitter Canada allowed us to use their proprietary Q&A video app to answer parents’ questions live over video. This was the first time the app, which has been previously been used only by high profile individuals and celebrities (e.g., Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, athlete Jose Bautista), was used to engage with the public about health information.

The Twitter party generated more than 7,000 tweets about children’s pain with over 350 participants and had a reach of over 6 million people. There were over 3,000 views of the videotaped answers to parents’ questions about pain. Moreover, #ItDoesntHaveToHurt trended #1 on social media that evening.

To date, #ItDoesntHaveToHurt has been primarily funded by a Knowledge to Action operating grant from the Canadian Institutions of Health Research. Partners include: the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation, the Canadian Pain Coalition, and the Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres of Canada. The IWK Health Centre recently announced that they will be funding a continuation of the initiative into 2017.

More information about the event with Twitter Canada can be found in these media articles:

Summaries of the tweets sent during the event at Twitter Canada and during the online Twitter Party (including videotaped responses to parents) can be found at:

More information about #ItDoesntHaveTohurt is available at: http://itdoesnthavetohurt.ca/ and all of our #ItDoesntHaveToHurt content for parents is archived at: http://pediatric-pain.ca/ItDoesntHaveToHurtInitiative

Best treatment for wrist buckle fractures

The CHEO Research Institute’s Spotlight on Research video series showcases some of their leading researchers in priority areas.  Over the coming months we will be sharing some of these videos through the CAPHC Conversations Blog.

For more information on the CHEO Research Institute or the Spotlight on Research series, contact Adrienne Vienneau, Director, Communications and Public Relations at avienneau@cheo.on.ca.

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Dr. Amy Plint, CHEO Emergency Department physician and scientist, describes a research project that determines the best way to treat wrist buckle fractures, a very common injury for kids. The discovery was practice-changing at CHEO – now kids get better, faster and with less inconvenience and pain too.

Learn more about Dr. Plint http://tinyurl.com/pzkz8yf

A written transcript of this video is available in French, upon request. Please email RIwebmaster@cheo.on.ca

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The CAPHC team is always interested in learning more about what is happening in the paediatric health care community. If you have a program, event, website, or initiative that you would like to share with the country, email info@caphc.org for more information.

CAPHC 2016 Citizenship Award

CAPHC 2016 Citizenship Award
Presented to The Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation
CAPHC 2016 Annual Awards Luncheon
October 25, 2016
Halifax, Nova Scotia

The CAPHC Citizenship Award was established in 2007 by the CAPHC Board of Directors and is presented each year in appreciation and national recognition of an Organization, Foundation, or Corporation’s commitment to the health and well-being of Canada’s children and youth.

On October 25, 2016 at CAPHC’s Annual Awards Luncheon, held this year in Halifax Nova Scotia, the CAPHC Board of Directors was honoured to recognize The Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation as the recipient of the CAPHC 2016 Citizenship Award.

Since 1957, the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation has inspired and enabled local, provincial, national and international excellence in research, patient & family health services and education. The work of the Foundation has resulted in many innovative and effective programs for many children and youth around the world.

Some of these innovations include Brain Health, Family Centred Care, Health Genomics and Informatics, new treatments in Childhood Epilepsy, leadership in Paediatric Simulation Programs and Hospital at Home; the first in Canada pilot program providing chemotherapy in the home.

The Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation’s philanthropic leadership is further demonstrated by being accredited under Imagine Canada’s Standards’ Program.

The Accreditation Trustmark demonstrates that the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation meets the highest standards of business practice in the charitable sector.

Traditionally, philanthropic organizations have supported advancements in health care through the development of infrastructure and the funding of research. The drivers of significant improvement in child health outcomes have shifted from technological advances to innovation in health service delivery, something that CAPHC believes is extremely important.

Through its willingness to provide financial supported activities for innovative program development, the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation has been a true philanthropic and collaborative partner. This has enabled the Foundation to transform in how they enable care for patients, creating a significant and lasting impact on our paediatric healthcare system and on the outcome of the children and families of this country and worldwide.

At this year’s Awards Luncheon, CAPHC also recognized the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation’s longstanding partnership with CAPHC and their commitment to the health and well-being of Canada’s children and youth through support of CAPHC’s work since 2011.

As a most valued philanthropic leader, the CAPHC Board of Directors is truly honoured to recognize the Alberta Children’s Hospital Fondation (ACHF), as CAPHC’s 2016 Citizenship Award Recipient.

Congratulation to Ms. Saifa Koonar, President and CEO, Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation and to all our ACHF colleagues!

Elaine Orrbine
President & CEO

Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres

CAPHC 2016 Contribution to Child Health Award

CAPHC 2016 Contribution to Child Health Award
Presented to Dr Shoo Lee
CAPHC 2016 Annual Awards Luncheon
October 25, 2016
Halifax, Nova Scotia

Established by the CAPHC Board of Directors in 2005, this prestigious award recognizes outstanding achievement from multiple perspectives and was created to recognize individuals who have dedicated their careers to making a difference in the lives and well-being of children, youth and families in Canada.

On October 25, 2016, at CAPHC’s Annual Awards Luncheon, held this year in Halifax, Nova Scotia, the CAPHC Board of Directors was honoured to recognize Dr. Shoo Lee as the recipient of the CAPHC 2016 Contribution to Child Health Award.

Dr. Lee received his medical degree from the University of Singapore and then completed his paediatric training at the Janeway Children's Hospital in St. John’s Newfoundland. He completed his neonatal fellowship training at Boston Children's Hospital, before receiving his PhD in Health Policy from Harvard University.

Dr. Lee is the current Scientific Director of the CIHR Institute of Human Development, Child and Youth Health, a practicing neonatologist and health economist, and Professor of Paediatrics, Obstetrics & Gynaecology and Public Health at the University of Toronto. Dr. Lee is also the Paediatrician-in-Chief and Director of the Maternal-Infant Care Research Centre, at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto.

Dr. Lee is the founder of the Canadian Neonatal Network and the International Neonatal Collaboration which fosters research and leads the CIHR Team in Maternal-Infant Care. Dr. Lee’s research focuses on improving quality of care, patient outcomes and health care services; all very important to the CAPHC’s community.

Awards for Dr. Lee’s work include many:

  • The CIHR Knowledge Translation Award;
  • The Aventis Pasteur Research Award;
  • The Distinguished Neonatologist Award from the Canadian Paediatric Society,
  • The Premier Member of Honour Award; and
  • The Magnolia Award by the Shanghai Government.

The Canadian Neonatal Network has had a profound impact on the practice of neonatology in Canada and around the world.

Today, the Canadian Neonatal Network includes all Canadian level 3 neonatal intensive care units and an increased proportion of level 2 nurseries. The Network produces national population data on the mortality and morbidity of extremely premature infants. All Canadian Neonatal Intensive Care Units are now working together as a national collaborative, to improve the care and outcomes of premature infants and together have had a remarkable impact on patient outcomes.

In recognition of Dr Lee’s outstanding work, research, leadership and dedication to the health and well-being of Canada’s Children and Youth we are truly honoured to recognize Dr. Shoo Lee as CAPHC’s 2016 Contribution to Child Health Award Recipient.

Congratulations Dr. Lee!

Elaine Orrbine
President & CEO

Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres